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Pledge to the flag of the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA


I PLEDGE ALLEGIANCE TO THE FLAG OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
AND TO THE REPUBLIC FOR WHICH IT STANDS,
ONE NATION UNDER GOD, INDIVISIBLE*, WITH LIBERTY AND JUSTICE FOR ALL.

Pledge to the GEORGIA Flag



I PLEDGE ALLEGIANCE TO THE GEORGIA STATE FLAG
AND TO PRINCIPLES FOR WHICH IT STANDS,
WISDOM, JUSTICE AND MODERATION.

Salute to the CONFEDERATE Flag


I SALUTE THE CONFEDERATE FLAG WITH AFFECTION, REVERENCE AND
UNDYING DEVOTION TO THE CAUSE* FOR WHICH IT STANDS.
*That Cause is resistance to nationlist tyrrany and the preservation of states' rights and individual liberty.

 

Historical and Current Articles submitted by Compatriots

 

 


The Religion of Political Correctness- Pastor John Weaver Click Here to see youtube video


November 2015 issue Immortal 600 camp Newsletter


The Civil War: 1864

First Day of Issue
July 30, 2014  •  Petersburg, VA; Mobile, AL
Series
Civil War Sesquicentennial

The Civil War (1861-1865), the most wrenching chapter in American history, claimed the lives of more than 620,000 soldiers and brought vast changes to the country. The Postal Service™ continues its commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the war by issuing a souvenir sheet of two stamp designs for 2014.

One stamp depicts the 22nd United States Colored Troops engaged in the June 15-18, 1864, assault on Petersburg, Virginia, at the beginning of the Petersburg Campaign. The other stamp depicts Admiral David G. Farragut’s fleet at the Battle of Mobile Bay (Alabama) on August 5, 1864.

Art director Phil Jordan created the stamps using iconic images of the battles. The Petersburg Campaign stamp is a reproduction of a painting, dated 1892, by J. André Castaigne. The Battle of Mobile Bay stamp is a reproduction of a painting by Julian Oliver Davidson, published ca. 1886 by Louis Prang & Co.

For the background image on the souvenir sheet, Jordan used a photograph of Battery A, 2nd U.S. Colored Artillery (Light), Department of the Cumberland, 1864.

The souvenir sheet includes comments on the war by Ulysses S. Grant, Jeremiah Tate, Harrie Webster, and Howell Cobb. It also includes some of the lyrics from the Negro spiritual “O Mary, Don’t You Weep.”

The Petersburg Campaign and the Battle of Mobile Bay stamps are being issued as Forever® stamps. These Forever® stamps will always be equal in value to the current First-Class Mail® one-ounce rate.

Digital Color Postmarks

The Civil War: 1864<BR>  : Digital Color PostmarkThe Civil War: 1864<BR>  : Digital Color Postmark

Black Pictorials

The Civil War: 1864<BR>  : Black PictorialThe Civil War: 1864<BR>  : Black Pictorial

Products

Souvenir Sheet of 12

$5.88
587304

Press Sheet with die cuts

$35.28
587306

Press Sheet without die cuts

$35.28
587308

First Day Covers (Set of 2 Petersburg & Mobile)

$1.86
587316

First Day Cancelled (Full Sheet)

$8.38
587319

Ceremony Program (2 stamps, 2 cancels)

$6.95
587330

Digital Color Postmark First Day Covers (Set of 2, Petersburg & Mobile)

$3.28
587321

Souvenir Sheet of 12 & Digital Color Postmark First Day Covers (Set of 2, Petersburg & Mobile)

$9.95
587310

The Civil War: 1864 Commemorative Folio with sheet of 12

$16.95
587327

Framed Stamps with First Day of Issue Plaque

$39.95
587324

From: "Carl Tommy Miller"
Subject: USPS Stamps available

The Civil War: 1865

First Day of Issue
April 9, 2015  •  Appomattox, VA 24522
Series
Civil War Sesquicentennial
The Civil War (1861-1865), the most wrenching chapter in American history, claimed the lives of more than 620,000 soldiers and brought vast changes to the country. The Postal Service™ concludes its commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the war by issuing a souvenir sheet with two new stamp designs for 2015.
One stamp depicts the Battle of Five Forks, near Petersburg, Virginia, on April 1, 1865. The other stamp depicts Robert E. Lee’s surrender to Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House on April 9.
Art director Phil Jordan selected historic paintings for the stamp designs. The Battle of Five Forks stamp is a reproduction of a painting, circa 1885, by French artist Paul Dominique Philippoteaux. The Appomattox Court House stamp is a reproduction of the 1895 painting “Peace in Union” by Thomas Nast, depicting Robert E. Lee’s surrender.
For the background image on the souvenir sheet, Jordan used a photograph of a number of Federal rifles stacked in the vicinity of Petersburg, Virginia, during the siege.
The 12-stamp souvenir sheet includes comments on the war by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., Abraham Lincoln, Robert E. Lee, and Union General Joshua L. Chamberlain. It also includes lines parodying the lyrics of Patrick S. Gilmore’s famous Civil War song, “When Johnny Comes Marching Home.”
The Battle of Five Forks and the Appomattox Court House stamps are being issued as Forever® stamps. These Forever® stamps will always be equal in value to the current First-Class Mail® one-ounce price.

Brother Keith "Rebel" Nelson regularly sends articles

from the Civil War Trust website. There are many great

articles regrarding the preservation and history of Battlefields

Take time to visit their site


SouthernTraditions- Jerry Clower


Mr. Confederate Man Music Video

 



A Very Nice music Video in memory of

Pvt. J.W. Robinson of the Maury Light Artillery

Maury County, Tennessee and his loving wife Josephine

Courtesy of David Armour


An Eagle Scout project in South georgia honoring Confederate Soldiers


A Video Presentation of the Confederate Powderworks


http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/portrepublic/port-republic-2014/- Save Port Republic courtesy of Keith Nelson

 

http://www.jewishmag.com/112mag/confederates/confederates.htm - Jewish Confederates courtesy of Jack Rawdin

 

http://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2014/05/the_quiet_sesquicentennial_of_the_war_between_the_states.html  -

The Quiet Sesquicentennial courtesy of Michael Kilpatrick

 

  Courtesy of David Armour


A poem Worth Reading

Subject: Fw: A Poem worth reading  
 
He was getting old and paunchy
And his hair was falling fast,
And he sat around the Legion,
Telling stories of the past.
Of a war that he once fought in
And the deeds that he had done,
In his exploits with his buddies;
They were heroes, every one.
And 'tho sometimes to his neighbors
His tales became a joke,
All his buddies listened quietly
For they knew where of he spoke.
But we'll hear his tales no longer,
For ol' Joe has passed away,
And the world's a little poorer
For a Veteran died today.
He won't be mourned by many,
Just his children and his wife.
For he lived an ordinary,
Very quiet sort of life.
He held a job and raised a family,
Going quietly on his way;
And the world won't note his passing,
'Tho a Veteran died today.
When politicians leave this earth,
Their bodies lie in state,
While thousands note their passing,
And proclaim that they were great.

Papers tell of their life stories
From the time that they were young,
But the passing of a Veteran
Goes unnoticed, and unsung.
Is the greatest contribution
To the welfare of our land,
Some jerk who breaks his promise
And cons his fellow man?
Or the ordinary fellow
Who in times of war and strife,
Goes off to serve his country
And offers up his life?
The politician's stipend
And the style in which he lives,
Are often disproportionate,
To the service that he gives.
While the ordinary Veteran,
Who offered up his all,
Is paid off with a medal
And perhaps a pension, small.
It is not the politicians
With their compromise and ploys,
Who won for us the freedom
That our country now enjoys.
Should you find yourself in danger,
With your enemies at hand,
Would you really want some cop-out,
With his ever-waffling stand?
Or would you want a Veteran
His home, his country, his kin,
Just a common Veteran,
Who would fight until the end.
He was just a common Veteran,
And his ranks are growing thin,
But his presence should remind us
We may need his likes again.
 
For when countries are in conflict,
We find the Veteran's part,
Is to clean up all the troubles
That the politicians start.
If we cannot do him honor
While he's here to hear the praise,
Then at least let's give him homage
At the ending of his days.
Perhaps just a simple headline
In the paper that might say:
"OUR COUNTRY IS IN MOURNING,
A VETERAN DIED TODAY."

The Code Of Confederate Flag Etiquette

   These symbols have been abused and desecrated not only by those who hate The South, but increasingly by well-meaning Southerners. This Code of Confederate Flag Etiquette is designed as a guide for those who respect The South. If Southerners will not respect the Confederate flag, then how can we expect others to respect it?

It is our hope that this Code of Confederate Flag Etiquette will be adopted by Southern organizations and individuals as a guide to respecting and honoring the symbols of our beloved South and those who sacrificed and died to defend her.

This document is copyrighted in order to preserve its integrity, assure that there is a single recognized Code of Confederate Flag Etiquette, and to control revisions. It is licensed using the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 unported license. You are free to copy, distribute, share, remix, and adapt it for commercial or non-commercial purposes. The only requirement is that attribution be included; this means that a link must be included to www.confederatecolonel.com . It is our intention that this Code be used and distributed as widely as possible. You are encouraged to download the PDF version and add it to your own web site – or simply provide a link to it here. If you have a specific use that you feel may not be covered by the license, please use the Contact Us form and we will do whatever we can to help get it widely distributed. Thank you for your understanding.

If you have comments or suggestions for amending the Code, please use the Contact Us form. Suggestions will be reviewed by a group of advisers and a decision will be made by that group. As the copyright holder, my role is that of administrator and custodian – neither I, nor anyone else, “owns” this Code of Confederate Flag Etiquette.

The Code of Confederate Flag Etiquette was adopted by the Military Order of The Stars and Bars in July 2011. If you would like to add your organization to a list of those who formally adopt this Code as the recognized standard for the use of the Confederate flag, please use the Contact Us form for details. Adoption of this Code does not, in any way, imply agreement or endorsement of anything else on this web site.


PREAMBLE
The flag and other symbols of the Confederate States of America represent the dreams of a Southern nation for which our ancestors sacrificed their lives and their fortunes, and for the high and noble standards that we should once again strive for. The flags and other symbols of the Confederate States of America should be treated with the highest respect and never used or modified in a manner that diminishes the image of a great and noble South. Use of the Confederate flag should be held to the same high standards as any other national flag.

DEFINITIONS
The Flag is defined as any of the flags used by the Confederate States of America. This includes:
a. First National or Stars and Bars
b. Second National or Stainless Banner
c. Third National <> Current National Flag of CSA 
d. Bonnie Blue Flag
e. Confederate Battle Flag
f. Confederate Naval Jack
g. Any object which the average person seeing the same without deliberation may believe the same to represent the flag, colors, standard, or ensign of the Confederate States of America.

MODIFICATIONS AND USE OF THE FLAG
The flag should never be modified in any way. It should be displayed as originally designed without alteration.
The basic flag design may be incorporated into the logo of an organization only if it is done in such a manner as to hold the Confederate States of America in the highest respect.
The flag, or design elements of the flag, should never be used to associate The South or the Confederate States of America with any other political or social agenda.

Examples of ACCEPTABLE incorporation into a design are:
a. Sons of Confederate Veterans logo
b. United Daughters of The Confederacy logo
c. State flags

Examples of UNACCEPTABLE incorporation into a design are:
a. Images of the Confederate flag, or design elements of the flag, combined with images of skulls, motorcycles, or other objects that detract from the honor and respect due the flag.

Examples of UNACCEPTABLE use of the flag:
a. The Confederate flag with images of skulls, motorcycles, or any other object.
b. The Confederate flag incorporated into any article of clothing. An exception to this is neck ties and lapel pins that have traditionally been used to respectfully display patriotic symbols.

Examples of ACCEPTABLE use of the flag image:
a. Bunting or similar material used for patriotic decoration which includes design elements of the Confederate flag, or images of the flag such that it is clearly not being used as a flag. Examples would be the flag: depicted furled, on a staff, carried in battle, in a memorial arrangement.

DISPLAY OF THE FLAG **
##**No disrespect should be shown to the flag of the Confederate States of America; the flag should not be dipped to any person or thing.##**
(a) The flag should never be displayed with the field down, except as a signal of dire distress in instances of extreme danger to life or property.
(b) The flag should never touch anything beneath it, such as the ground, the floor, water, or merchandise.
(c) The flag should never be carried flat or horizontally, but always aloft and free.
(d) The flag should never be used as wearing apparel, bedding, or drapery. It should never be festooned, drawn back, nor up, in folds, but always allowed to fall free.
(e) The flag should never be fastened, displayed, used, or stored in such a manner as to permit it to be easily torn, soiled, or damaged in any way.
(f) The flag should never be used as a covering for a ceiling.
(g) The flag should never have placed upon it, nor on any part of it, nor attached to it any mark, insignia, letter, word, figure, design, picture, or drawing of any nature. An exception to this is unit markings on the flag when used by historical re-enactors.
(h) The flag should never be used as a receptacle for receiving, holding, carrying, or delivering anything.
(i) The flag should never be used for advertising purposes in any manner whatsoever. It should not be embroidered on such articles as cushions or handkerchiefs and the like, printed or otherwise impressed on paper napkins or boxes or anything that is designed for temporary use and discard. Advertising signs should not be fastened to a staff or halyard from which the flag is flown.
(j) No part of the flag should ever be used as a costume or athletic uniform. However, a flag patch may be affixed to the uniform of military personnel, firemen, policemen, and members of patriotic organizations. The flag represents a living country and is itself considered a living thing. Therefore, the lapel flag pin being a replica, should be worn on the left lapel near the heart.
(k) The flag, when it is in such condition that it is no longer a fitting emblem for display, should be destroyed in a dignified way, preferably by burning.

FOLDING THE FLAG
To fold the flag, two persons face each other and hold the flag waist high and horizontally between them. They fold the lower half of the flag lengthwise over the upper half; then fold it again in the same manner. The person holding the fly end folds the lower right corner to the upper edge to form a triangle, folds the outer point inward to form a second triangle, and continues to fold the flag in triangles until the entire length of the flag is folded, ending with the hoist end to the outside.

OCCASIONS FOR DISPLAY
(a) Display on buildings and stationary flagstaffs in open.
Night display: It is the universal custom to display the flag only from sunrise to sunset on buildings and on stationary flagstaffs in the open. However, when a patriotic effect is desired, the flag may be displayed twenty-four hours a day. It is preferred that the flag be properly illuminated during the hours of darkness.
(b) Manner of hoisting
The flag should be hoisted briskly and lowered ceremoniously.
(c) Inclement weather
The flag should not be displayed on days when the weather is inclement, except when an all weather flag is displayed.
(d) Particular days of display
The flag should be displayed on all days, especially on:
January 19 – Robert E. Lee Birthday – Confederate Heroes Day (TX)
January 21 – Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson Birthday
February 22 – Confederate Independence Day (Founding of the C.S.A. / Jefferson Davis inaugurated)
March 4 – Confederate Flag Day
March 27 – Confederate Day of Prayer, designated by President Jefferson Davis in 1863 as a day of “fasting, humiliation, and prayer” in the Confederate States
April 26 – Confederate Memorial Day (AL, FL, GA, MS)
May 10 – Confederate Memorial Day (NC, SC); “Stonewall” Jackson died
May 30 – Confederate Memorial Day (VA)
June 3 – Confederate Memorial Day (KY, LA, TN); Jefferson Davis Birthday
October 12 – Robert E. Lee died
December 6 – Jefferson Davis died


The Terrible Truth About Abraham Lincoln

President Lincoln has been all but deified in America, with a god-like giant statue at a Parthenon-like memorial in Washington. Generations of school children have been indoctrinated with the story that “Honest Abe” Lincoln is a national hero who saved the Union and fought a noble war to end slavery, and that the “evil” Southern states seceded from the Union to protect slavery. This is the Yankee myth of history, written and promulgated by Northerners, and it is a complete falsity. It was produced and entrenched in the culture in large part to gloss over the terrible war crimes committed by Union soldiers in the War Between the States, as well as Lincoln’s violations of the law, his shredding of the Constitution, and other reprehensible acts. It has been very effective in keeping the average American ignorant of the real causes of the war, and the real nature, character and record of Lincoln. Let us look at some unpleasant facts.

In his first inaugural address, Lincoln stated clearly that (1) he had no legal authority to interfere with slavery where it existed, (2) that he had no inclination or intention to do so even if he had the legal authority, (3) that he would enforce the Fugitive Slave Act, returning runaway slaves escaping to the North to their masters in the South, and (4) that he fully supported the Thirteenth Amendment then being debated in Congress which would protect slavery in perpetuity and was irrevocable. He later famously stated, “Do not paint me with the Abolitionist brush.”

 

Although there was some opposition to slavery in the country, the government was willing to concede everything the South wanted regarding slavery to keep it in the Union. Given all these facts, the idea that the South seceded to protect slavery is as absurd as the idea that Lincoln fought the war to end slavery. Lincoln himself said in a famous letter after the war began that his sole purpose was to save the Union, and not to either save or end slavery; that if he could save the Union without freeing a single slave, he would. Nothing could be clearer.

For decades before the war, the South, through harsh tariffs, had been supplying about 85% of the country’s revenue, nearly all of which was being spent in the North to boost its economy, build manufacturing, infrastructure, railroads, canals, etc. With the passage of the 47% Morrill Tariff the final nail was in the coffin. The South did not secede to protect slavery, although certainly they wished to protect it; they seceded over a dispute about unfair taxation, an oppressive Federal government, and the right to separate from that oppression and be governed “by consent”, exactly the same issues over which the Founding Fathers fought the Revolutionary War. When a member of Lincoln’s cabinet suggested he let the South go in peace, Lincoln famously replied, “Let the South go? Where, then, would we get our revenue!” He then launched a brutal, empirical war to keep the free and sovereign states, by force of arms, in the Union they had created and voluntarily joined, and then voluntarily left. This began his reign of terror.

Lincoln was the greatest tyrant and despot in American history. In the first four months of his presidency, he created a complete military dictatorship, destroyed the Constitution, ended forever the constitutional republic which the Founding Fathers instituted, committed horrendous crimes against civilian citizens, and formed the tyrannical, overbearing and oppressive Federal government which the American people suffer under to this day. In his first four months, he

  1. Failed to call Congress into session after the South fired upon Fort Sumter, in direct violation of the Constitution.
  2. Called up an army of 75,000 men, bypassing the Congressional authority in direct violation of the Constitution.
  3. Unilaterally suspended the writ of habeas corpus, a function of Congress, violating the Constitution. This gave him the power, as he saw it, to arrest civilians without charge and imprison them indefinitely without trial—which he did.
  4. Ignored a Supreme Court order to restore the right of habeas corpus, thus violating the Constitution again and ignoring the Separation of Powers which the Founders put in place exactly for the purpose of preventing one man’s using tyrannical powers in the executive.
  5. When the Chief Justice forwarded a copy of the Supreme Court’s decision to Lincoln, he wrote out an order for the arrest of the Chief Justice and gave it to a U.S. Marshall for expedition, in violation of the Constitution.
  6. Unilaterally ordered a naval blockade of southern ports, an act of war, and a responsibility of Congress, in violation of the Constitution.
  7. Commandeered and closed over 300 newspapers in the North, because of editorials against his war policy and his illegal military invasion of the South. This clearly violated the First Amendment freedom of speech and press clauses.
  8. Sent in Army forces to destroy the printing presses and other machinery at those newspapers, in violation of the Constitution.
  9. Arrested the publishers, editors and owners of those newspapers, and imprisoned them without charge and without trial for the remainder of the war, all in direct violation of both the Constitution and the Supreme Court order aforementioned.
  10. Arrested and imprisoned, without charge or trial, another 15,000-20,000 U.S. citizens who dared to speak out against the war, his policies, or were suspected of anti-war feelings. (Relative to the population at the time, this would be equivalent to President G.W. Bush arresting and imprisoning roughly 150,000-200,000 Americans without trial for “disagreeing” with the Iraq war; can you imagine?)
  11. Sent the Army to arrest the entire legislature of Maryland to keep them from meeting legally, because they were debating a bill of secession; they were all imprisoned without charge or trial, in direct violation of the Constitution.
  12. Unilaterally created the state of West Virginia in direct violation of the Constitution.
  13. Sent 350,000 Northern men to their deaths to kill 350,000 Southern men in order to force the free and sovereign states of the South to remain in the Union they, the people, legally voted to peacefully withdraw from, all in order to continue the South’s revenue flow into the North.

These are just a few of the most egregious things Lincoln did during his despotic presidency. He set himself up as a tyrannical dictator with powers never before utilized or even imagined by any previous administration. During this four years of terrible war he was one of the greatest despots the world has ever known, his tyranny focused against his own countrymen, both North and South. He was called a despot and tyrant by many newspapers and citizens both North and South, until he had imprisoned nearly all those who dared to simply speak out against his unconstitutional usurpations of power. Those who disagreed with him were branded as “traitors”, just as were the brave and honorable men in the states which had legally seceded from the Union over just such issues as these criminal abuses of power by the Federal government.

Four months after Fort Sumter, when Lincoln finally called Congress back into session, no one dared oppose anything he wanted or speak out against him for fear of imprisonment, so completely had he entrenched his unilateral power and silenced his other many critics.

The Union army, under Generals Grant, Sherman, Sheridan and President Lincoln, committed active genocide against Southern civilians—this is difficult for some to believe, but it is explicit in their writings and dispatches at the time and indisputable in their actions. Tens of thousands of Southern men, women and children—civilians—white and black, slave and free alike—were shot, hanged, raped, imprisoned without trial, their homes, lands and possessions stolen, pillaged and burned, in one of the most horrific and brutal genocides ever inflicted upon a people anywhere; but the Yankee myth of history is silent in these well-documented matters. For an excellent expose of these war crimes and their terrible extent, see War Crimes Against Southern Civilians by Walter Brian Cisco.

Only after the Union had suffered two years of crushing defeats in battle did Lincoln resolve to “emancipate” the slaves, and only as a war measure, a military tactic, not for moral or humanitarian purposes. He admitted this, remarking, “We must change tactics or lose the game.” He was hoping, as his original draft of the document shows, that a slave uprising would occur, making it harder for Southerners to continue the war. His only interest in freeing the slaves was in forcing the South to remain in the Union. His Emancipation Proclamation was denounced by Northerners, Southerners and Europeans alike for its absurdity and hypocrisy; for, it only “freed” the slaves in the seceded states—where he could not reach them—and kept slavery intact in the North and the border states—where he could have freed them at once.

The Gettysburg Address, the most famous speech in American history, is an absurd piece of war rhetoric and a poetry of lies. We were not “engaged in a great Civil War, to see whether that nation, or any nation so conceived, can long endure.” The South was engaged in a War of Independence from a tyrannical North, and after having legally seceded, wished only “to be let alone.” The North was engaged in a war of empire, to keep the South involuntarily under its yoke. Government “of the people, by the people and for the people” would not have “perished from the earth” had the North lost the war; on the contrary, it perished in the United States when the North won the war; for, freely representative government, by consent of the governed, is exactly what the South was fighting for and exactly what Lincoln’s military victory destroyed.

The checks and balances of powers, the separation of powers, the constitutional constraints so carefully and deliberately put into place by the Founding Fathers, had all been destroyed in Lincoln’s first months. The Republic which the Founders gave us had been completely destroyed and a new nation-state was set up; one in which the free and sovereign States would afterward be only vassals and tributaries, slaves to an all-powerful, oppressive Federal government. This new nation-state is completely different in both nature and consequence to the original American Republic. One only has to look around today to see the end results and legacy of Lincoln’s war, his destruction of freedom, and his institution of despotic, centralized governmental power and tyranny.

In retrospect, it is a tragedy that John Wilkes Booth did not act four years earlier. Slavery would have ended naturally, as it has everywhere else (except in African and Arab states); the American Republic, liberty, and 700,000 lives would have been saved, and untold thousands of those young men would have lived to contribute their ingenuity, inventions, creativity and talents to the political, economic, literary, scientific and social legacy of our people. And the greatest despotic tyrant in American history would never have gained the foothold of power or been able to establish the oppressive and omnipotent Federal government we all suffer under today.